Broad Scale Field Surveys

From drones to satellites to over-water and upland imagery, GSI leverages computer vision to enhance classic field crew-based surveys.

Computer visions is a rising interdisciplinary service that implements tools that allow computers to gain high level information from digital images or videos. It essentially seeks to train computers to automate tasks that we would normally do, literally, by eye. The automation allows us to analyze not just a handful or a hundred images, but to automate the analysis of thousands of images, such as those obtained from a field camera positioned to observe either human or animal activities for a site-use survey or those taken from a sediment profile imaging (SPI) survey. These methods are also used to analyze satellite derived data for remotely sensed surface water properties or land-use features. Even the analysis of multiple drone surveys over a managed track of land for either invasive plant species monitoring, or wild-fire recovery becomes possible due to the efficiency the use of computer vision methods affords.

Computer vision coupled with both the affordability of camera systems and increase in publicly available imagery means these types of services are efficient and provide added value to site characterizations for minimal costs.

Survey methods include:

FEATURED PROJECTS

Phenocam for wild-fire recovery monitoring – development of an integrated sensor network, Bitterbrush Site, Washington

Advances in remote sensing technologies provide unique opportunities to understand long-term impacts of wildfires on ecosystem dynamics. GSI is developing a cost-effective, integrated sensor network to provide continuous measurements of key environmental metrics to help understand how different landscapes recover after wildfires. We are developing and testing a customized monitoring system on a 60-acre site in eastern WA that burned during the 2014 Carlton Complex Wildfire. In September 2020, GSI installed a PhenoCam to remotely monitor the site and evaluate seasonal and year-to-year changes. On-site time-lapse imagery provides continuous monitoring across sites at spatial and temporal resolutions that are difficult to achieve with traditional satellite platforms or even aerial drone surveys. In 2021 GSI will be integrating additional long-term measurements that will include data derived from acoustic recordings, and sensor data from weather monitoring stations. Stay tuned!

Phenocam for wild-fire recovery monitoring – development of an integrated sensor network, Bitterbrush Site

Washington

Advances in remote sensing technologies provide unique opportunities to understand long-term impacts of wildfires on ecosystem dynamics. GSI is developing a cost-effective, integrated sensor network to provide continuous measurements of key environmental metrics to help understand how different landscapes recover after wildfires. We are developing and testing a customized monitoring system on a 60-acre site in eastern WA that burned during the 2014 Carlton Complex Wildfire. In September 2020, GSI installed a PhenoCam to remotely monitor the site and evaluate seasonal and year-to-year changes. On-site time-lapse imagery provides continuous monitoring across sites at spatial and temporal resolutions that are difficult to achieve with traditional satellite platforms or even aerial drone surveys. In 2021 GSI will be integrating additional long-term measurements that will include data derived from acoustic recordings, and sensor data from weather monitoring stations. Stay tuned!

Contact Us

Brandon Sackmann,
PhD, GISP

Senior Aquatic Scientist